Thursday, September 21, 2017

'Ask Us Anything' @ Ezra Lehman Memorial Library

'Ask Us Anything' exhibit explores history of Ezra Lehman Memorial Library

‘Ask Us Anything’: 50 Years at Ezra Lehman Memorial Library, opening this week on the second floor of the library, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the library during the 2017-2018 academic year. The exhibit, featuring artifacts and photos from Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, traces the history of libraries on campus, the decision to build the new library, and the present library building. Also featured are images of the library as it appeared in 1968 compared to today.
In September of 1967, Shippensburg State College (SSC) students returning to classes were greeted by the hum of construction vehicles moving earth near the center of campus. Construction was nothing new, SSC was in the middle of explosive growth thanks to rapidly rising enrollments. But the building rising during the fall 1967 was to affect the campus for generations. The new Ezra Lehman Memorial Library was well under way.
The new building, a modular-style, three-floor space, dramatically increased the capacity of this campus resource. Since 1931, the library had been in what is today Huber Arts Center. That building, too, was purpose built for books and studying. Consisting of three floors, it had balconies, more than 100,000 books, and study space for students, but it wasn’t enough.
In 1961, librarian Alma Winton joined others on campus to form a committee to update the library. At first, the plan was to expand the existing library. However, that spring, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania announced Shippensburg would be one of five schools across the system to receive up to $2 million to build new libraries to accommodate expanding enrollment and the need to update to national library standards.
The groundbreaking was held in August 1966, and by September 1967, the new library was under roof and contractors worked on finishing touches. By December, Winton and her staff had control of the space and began filling it with shelves and furniture. In May 1968, the campus community came together for a Book Walk to transport nearly 75,000 volumes from the old library to the new, and the new Ezra Lehman Memorial Library opened as the 1967-1968 school year closed.
The exhibit is free to view and is located just outside the stairwell on the second floor. For more information, contact Archives & Special Collections via email: specialcollections@ship.edu or phone: 717-477-1123 (x3357).

Thursday, September 14, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 9/14/17: Class songs

Hearing the opening notes of the Alma Mater never fails to inspire a twinge in the heart of proud students of Shippensburg University. The simple refrain and melody recall crisp fall days, favorite classes, parties, and football games.

Many students can even recall their high school alma maters, and grad students can probably sing the opening lines of their undergraduate anthems.

Shippensburg University's Alma Mater

In addition to the Alma Mater familiar to students today, past Shippensburg alumni composed special "Class Songs" to celebrate their time in the Cumberland Valley. Alumni enjoyed sharing these songs with each other both during their time as students and during reunions years later.



The Cumberland Valley State Normal School's Class of 1877 had both a "Class Song" and a "Tree Song" composed for their graduation.

Many of the historical lyrics expressed sadness that the class was about to graduate and expressed hope classmates would meet again.

Class of 1892 class song

The class of 1893 included their class song in their Class Day gathering during Commencement Week.

Class of 1893 Class Day program with class song.



Sometimes, class songwriters went so far as to write out the musical notation for the melody so classmates could play it at home for years to come.

Class of 1918 class song

And lest Cumberland Valley songsters felt limited to nostalgic lyrics mourning the end of classes, various other songs could be heard on campus especially during athletic games. Programs for homecoming games in the 1920s included a variety of yells and chants for fans to yell during the game.

School yells and songs from the 1925 homecoming football game.

Sources:
Class Files, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
Commencement programs, Record Group 4, Sub-group 1, Series 5, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.









Friday, September 8, 2017

Intellectual Property & The Value of Information


According to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), "Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names and imaged used in commerce."  However, not all intellectual property is the same.  In the United States, IP can sometimes fall into the categories of copyright, patents, or trademarks, and these categories may come with legal protections that allow the creator of the IP to earn recognition or financial benefits from the things they create or invent.

Copyright

In the United States, copyright is the legal term that explains the rights creators have over their literary and artistic works.  Things that fall under copyright protections include books, paintings, maps, computer programs and music.

Patents

In the United States, patents are exclusive rights given to a person or persons for an invention.  Whoever owns the patent gets to decide if and how other people can use the invention.  In turn, the patent owner has to publish a document that makes all the technical details about the invention available to the public.

Trademarks

In the United States, trademarks are signs that make it easy for people to distinguish goods or services that come from one company from goods or services coming from a different company.

Other Countries

In countries throughout the world, intellectual property rights and protections differ.  The International Property Rights Index for 2016 shows the United States is ranked 15th in the world for the security of IP rights.  Finland, New Zealand, and Luxembourg has the most secure property rights by this same ranking scale, while countries like Bangaladesh, Myanmar, and Venezuela fall at the bottom of the rankings.  Each country has its own unique legislation that governs how intellectual property, patents, and copyright works.  If you plan to create something, it's a good idea to check out the government protections available to you.


Thursday, September 7, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 9/7/17: Red Raiders Marching Band

Falling temperatures and colorful leaves mean a return to classes and papers for most Shippensburg students. But fall also means the return of football games, and with them, the Shippensburg University Red Raiders Marching Band!

Weeks before classes begin, members of the marching band return to campus for band camp. While there, instrumentalists, percussionists, and color guard all work together to learn the year's field show, spruce up pep band music, and rehearse for hours. The result is the most important part of any football game - school spirit.

The Red Raiders Marching Band plays at the homecoming game in 2014.

In the service of growing school spirit, the Shippensburg band program was launched in 1924 at Cumberland Valley State Normal School when a band of students got together to play pep band music at home athletic games and pep meetings. They didn't have uniforms, practice space, or nice instruments. After the football season ended, they converted themselves to a concert band.

The 1923-1924 C.V.S.N.S. school band.

By the next year, the band had gotten uniforms and instruments, and was granted practice space.

The 1930-1931 college band.

Throughout the next 50 years, the marching band became an integral part of home athletic contests, providing a soundtrack to wins and consolation during losses. They changed their uniforms several times, and in 1937, fully admitted women to the band and created a majorette and color guard.

During the 1970s, band members had a once in a lifetime experience when President-elect Jimmy Carter asked the group to perform in the 1977 inaugural parade in Washington D.C. Carter and his wife saw the band perform in Harrisburg during the 1976 campaign and Mrs. Carter enjoyed them so much she asked her husband to invite them to the inauguration. Though the band represented Pennsylvania in the parade, they received no state funding for their trip.

The Red Raiders Marching Band in the January 20, 1977 inaugural parade in Washington, D.C.

A letter of appreciation to the band from President Jimmy Carter.

The marching band continues to provide support to the football team at home games during fall semesters in addition to traveling to exhibitions and performances in Pennsylvania and Maryland each year.

Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections has a variety of photographs of band activities throughout the school's history, including in a full collection of school yearbooks. For more information and to do research at the archives, email specialcollections@ship.edu.

Sources:
Cumberland 1924, 107
Cumberland 1931, 160.
Cumberland 1977, 89, 91.
Cumberland 2015, 45
Shippensburg University Red Raiders Marching Band, "80 Years of School Spirit and Pride!," Record Group 18.6, File box 2, Folder 13, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
Slate, January 18, 1977.








Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Temporary Access to Library Databases

The library is experiencing technical difficulties from nationwide issues. Please use this Brief Database List when the main database list is still down.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

TBT in the Archives 8/31/17: Welcome Freshman!

Welcome back to the fall semester at Shippensburg University! Returning students are grateful to resume their studies, and new students are excited to begin their college career and make new friends.

Since 1872, Shippensburg has welcomed new students each year with rituals, special events, and orientation programs. This year, new and transfer students arrived on campus days before classes started for registration and placement testing, met with faculty, completed volunteer projects, and attended convocation. In the past, similar traditions prepared new students, but others served to remind them of their "fresh" status.

In 1913, "Ye Freshies Attention!" was issued to members of the incoming class. The booklet outlined "Ten Commandments" for freshman, including bans against walking on the grass, growing a mustache, or smoking tobacco.

"Ten Commandments" for freshman, issued in 1913.

An entire freshman handbook was issued by the campus YMCA in 1930. Inside was useful information on campus facilities and regulations, as well as study hours and curfews. Also included was a list of actual "Freshman Regulations." Among the rules were required attendance at athletic games, and the wearing of name cards and special hats called "dinks."

Freshman regulations and tips published in 1931 by the YMCA.

In 1948, freshman received a handbook with a handmade orange construction paper cover. The tone of the booklet was much kinder than the 1913 edition. Rather than frightening freshman with judicious use of a thesaurus, the book welcomed the Class of 1952 to campus and offered helpful tips on campus living: where to get room keys, what was in each building, why students must pay fees, and important landmarks and traditions.

A page outlining traditions from the 1948 freshman handbook.

A similar handbook distributed in 1956 offered similar information, including several pages of regulations for Horton Hall - then the women's dormitory. The cover featured a drawing of a dink.


The cover of the 1956 freshman handbook, featuring a drawing of a dink.

Required headwear for freshman from at least 1930 until about 1971, dinks were beanies with small brims. Throughout most of those years they came in the school colors: blue and red. They were meant to set freshman apart from the other classes and enable them to identify each other while enjoying school spirit. Failure to wear a dink until a set date in the fall (different from year to year) risked punishment for students.

An upperclassman, left, signs the name card of a dink-bedecked freshman.

In addition to dinks, freshman also had to wear large signs with their names written in block letters, and were required to have upperclassmen sign the back.

A freshman with dink and sign studies in the library in the late 1960s.

Linda Hartman was a member of the class of 1970 and wore this sign in 1966.

Though freshman no longer have to wear crazy hats or stay off the grass, its still important for new students to feel welcome at Shippensburg. What do you remember about your freshman orientation? Did you participate in any traditional activities?

Sources:
Class Files, 1970, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
“Freshman hand book, compliments of YMCA, 1930-1931,” Class Files 1931, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
Photographs, Record Group 30, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
State Teachers College Handbook, 1968-1969, Record Group 29, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
“Welcome Freshman,” Class Files 1948, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
“Welcome to S.S.T.C.,” Class Files 1956, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
“Ye Freshies Attention!,” Class Files 1913 (2), Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

On Reserve at the Circulation Desk!


Ten new books are now available for three-hour in library use only at the circulation desk! Because of the limited availability of these textbooks, students are encouraged to use these copies only as a supplemental material to their textbook purchases. Our new textbooks are featured below:




Watch Out! Copyright Laws Apply

Scanning and copying of these textbooks are permitted, but an excess of a chapter, or 10% of the book, is considered a copyright violation!

Never Fear…

The top ten textbooks from last semester are still here! These titles include:

Principles of Economics
Essential Environment
World Regional Geography
Marking An Introduction
Panorama
Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Charge
Principles of Microeconomics
The Ten Principles Behind Great Customers Experiences
Relationship Marketing
Foundations in Business Administration

Please contact any staff person at the Circulation Desk at 717-477-1461 or libcirc@ship.edu for additional support or stop in and see us in person today!

Friday, August 25, 2017

Fall Semester Library Hours

Welcome (back) for Fall Semester at Shippensburg University!

Lehman Library Regular Hours resume Monday, August 28:
Sundays: Noon to Midnight
Mon-Thu: 7:30 am to Midnight
Fridays: 7:30am to 6:00pm
Saturdays: 9:00am - 5:00pm
Luhrs Library, Technology Help, Research Help, and Events hours are listed on the Library Calendar

Remember: the library provides help and guidance for maximizing your research time and effort:

Research Consultations
Librarians are available to meet with you individually for one-on-one research consultation appointments. If you want help broadening or narrowing a topic, finding appropriate sources, or citing sources correctly, please set up an appointment with a librarian. This service has been heavily used by your fellow students in upper level courses in previous semesters.

Course Reserves
Your professor(s) may make supplemental reading materials available to you through the course reserves system, Ares. If you have questions about library reserves, or have issues with Ares, use the Ask Us Anything service to get research help.

We hope you have a great semester, and we look forward to working with you!

We highlighted several other services in our welcome note to new students, if we missed one of your faves, please tweet us @shiplibrary or tweet it yourself and tag #shiplibrary so we can connect!

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Welcome Back, Returning Students!

Welcome back, students!

We know you're relaxed from your summer and working hard to get ready for the fall semester. Here are several services the library offers for you and your peers.

Research Consultations
Librarians are available to meet with you individually for one-on-one research consultation appointments. If you want help broadening or narrowing a topic, finding appropriate sources, or citing sources correctly, please set up an appointment with a librarian. This service has been heavily used by your fellow students in upper level courses in previous semesters.

Course Reserves
Your professor(s) may make supplemental reading materials available to you through the course reserves system, Ares. If you have questions about library reserves, or have issues with Ares, use the Ask Us Anything service to get research help.

We hope you have a great semester, and we look forward to working with you!

We highlighted several other services in our welcome note to new students, if we missed one of your faves, please tweet us @shiplibrary or tweet it yourself and tag #shiplibrary so we can connect!

Monday, August 21, 2017

Welcome Back, Ship Faculty!

Welcome back, Ship Faculty! We know you're working hard to get ready for the fall semester. Below are several services the library can offer to you and your students.

Instruction
If you'll be assigning a research project to your students, consider scheduling an instruction session with a librarian. Librarians can meet with your classes to discuss the research process, explain how to effectively use library databases and resources, review how to properly cite sources, and more. Our newest librarian, Josefine Smith, will be coordinating the scheduling of library instruction sessions for the 2017-2018 academic year. To set up a library instruction session, contact Josefine (jmsmith@ship.edu). Or click here to find the library liaison to your department, and reach out to her/him directly.

Research Consultations
Librarians are available to meet with your students individually for one-on-one research consultation appointments. If students need help broadening or narrowing a topic, finding appropriate sources, or citing sources correctly, you may encourage them to set up an appointment with a librarian. This service has been heavily used by students in upper level courses in previous semesters.

Course Reserves
You may want to make reading materials available to your students through our course reserves system, Ares. Click here to learn more about Ares. If you have questions about reserves, or experience issues with Ares, the Circulation staff will be able to assist you (libcirc@ship.edu / 717-477-1461).

Book Orders
To request materials for the library collection, use GOBI. The GOBI ordering process is outlined in the GOBI quick start guide. If you have a question regarding GOBI orders, contact Nicole Zinn (ndzinn@ship.edu) in Collection Management.

We hope you have a great semester, and we look forward to working with you!

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Welcome Week Hours - Aug 21 through Aug 27

Ship Welcome Week Library Hours are as follows:
Monday, August 21   7:30am – 4:00pm
Tuesday, August 22   7:30am – 4:00pm
Wednesday, August 23   7:30am – 8:00pm
Thursday, August 24   7:30am – 8:00pm
Friday, August 25   7:30am – 8:00pm
Saturday, August 26   10:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday, August 27   Noon – 10:00pm

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Library Intersession Hours - Aug 12 through Aug 20

Welcome to Intersession, the library will be open as follows:

Saturday, August 12, 2016  Closed
Sunday, August 13, 2016  Closed
Monday, August 14, 2016  8:00-4:00
Tuesday, August 15, 2016  8:00-4:00
Wednesday, August 16, 2016  8:00-4:00   
Thursday, August 17, 2016  8:00-4:00
Friday, August 18, 2016  8:00-4:00
Saturday, August 19, 2016  Closed
Sunday, August 20, 2016  Closed

Enjoy your time out of class!
Check the Library Calendar for other dates! 

Monday, June 26, 2017

Summer Session B Library Hours - July 3 to August 11

Welcome back for Ship Summer Session B!

Summer Session B Library Hours are as follows:
Monday   7:30am – 8:00pm
Tuesday   7:30am – 8:00pm
Wednesday   7:30am – 8:00pm
Thursday   7:30am – 8:00pm
Friday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Saturday   Closed
Sunday   4:00pm – 8:00pm

With one holiday exception:
Tuesday, July 4   Closed for Independence Day

Monday, June 5, 2017

Looking for a new book to read?

Have you recovered from all the reading you did during the spring semester? Ready to pick up a new book to read for fun, but don't have a particular book in mind? Check out recommendmeabook.com.

Recommendmeabook takes the old adage that 'you shouldn't judge a book by its cover' seriously. Each time you visit the site, you will be presented with the first page or two of a book. If you like what you read, you can click a button to reveal the title and author. If you're not interested, click 'next book' to keep searching for the perfect summer read.

Want to know if Lehman Library has a particular book? Search the Ship discovery service or library catalog for the title. Even though it's summer break, you can still borrow books from the library!

Still not convinced? I gave it a whirl. When I opened recommendmeabook I read the first couple pages of Stephen King's On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. I've always been a big fan of King's horror novels. Looks like this is an autobiography he wrote in 2000. It could be neat to get a glimpse into his life and writing philosophy. I checked our Ship discovery service to see if we have On Writing, and just my luck - we do! Guess I know what I'll be reading next.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Summer Session A Library Hours - May 22 to June 30

Welcome back for Ship Summer Session A!

Summer Session A Library Hours are as follows:
Monday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Tuesday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Wednesday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Thursday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Friday   7:30am – 4:00pm
Saturday   Closed
Sunday   Closed

With one holiday exception:
Monday, May 29   Closed for Memorial Day

Breaking news: the last week of Summer A will have extended hours:
Sunday, June 25 4:00pm - 8:00pm
Monday, June 26   7:30am – 8:00pm
Tuesday, June 27   7:30am – 8:00pm
Wednesday, June 28   7:30am – 8:00pm
Thursday, June 29   7:30am – 8:00pm
Friday, June 30   7:30am – 4:00pm
Saturday   Closed

Check the Library Calendar for other dates! 

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Congratulations 2017 Spring Grads!


CONGRATULATIONS
 to our 2017 Spring Graduates!

You have burned the midnight oil, completed your studies, and are on your way! We've enjoyed helping you here in the library and we look forward to seeing your future success!



Several of you have worked with us in the library and while we're sad to see you go, we're looking forward to hearing about your future success!


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Library Intersession Hours - May 13 through May 21

Welcome to Intersession, the library will be open as follows:

Saturday, May 13, 2016Closed
Sunday, May 14, 2016Closed
Monday, May 15, 20168:00-4:00
Tuesday, May 16, 20168:00-4:00
Wednesday, May 17, 20168:00-4:00
Thursday, May 18, 20168:00-4:00
Friday, May 19, 20168:00-4:00
Saturday, May 20, 2016Closed
Sunday, May 21, 2016Closed

Enjoy your time out of class!
Check the Library Calendar for other dates! 

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Fall Registration Opportunity

Attention Students who have not yet registered for the Fall 2017 semester:

If you have not registered for the Fall 2017 semester now is the time! Ship is re-opening registration starting Finals Week Monday at 8am through Finals Week Wednesday at 4pm.

If you have a hold that is blocking you from registering, those holds will be temporarily suspended (Monday 8am to Wednesday 4pm) so you can register.

Finals Week, of course, is not the best time to be thinking about registering - however, it is important that you register for your Fall classes now. Classes with low enrollment will be cancelled over the summer.

Remember that Schedule Adjustment will re-open on August 1st - but you really should register for classes before the end of Finals (for best availability).

See your advisor ot College Dean for more information!

Thursday, May 4, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 5/4/17: May Day

Celebrating the end of winter, the blooming of flowers, warm temperatures, and summer is nothing new. At Shippensburg in 2017, students flock to the red and blue lawn chairs scattered across campus, enjoy meals outside, and up their runs or cycling sessions outside.

Past students at Shippensburg also marked the coming of spring and summer, but with a bit more pomp and celebration. The annual May Day festivities included dancing, royalty, theater, and festivities on campus until the mid-1950s.

May Day Queen and her court, c. late 1940s.

Traditionally, May Day has been celebrated with a variety of activities. Children gather flowers to keep or bestow on others in celebration of spring, and May Poles are decorated with colorful streamers, which are wrapped around the pole by dancers.

Child attendants were regular members of Cumberland Valley State Normal School's May Day celebrations.

At Shippensburg, May Day also included the crowning of a May Queen (a senior woman) and her court of attendants (two from each class). With the exception of a few years, May Day was an annual campus event from the early 1900s until the 1950s. By the 1930s, celebrations included dramatic presentations, often of Shakespeare plays, and entire programs of dance related to the year's theme.


This Shippensburg State Teachers College May Day program features a print of a dancing girl celebrating nature.

In 1936, May Day was held in the SSTC Shakespeare Amphitheater, located generally where the Little Red Schoolhouse is today. The Campus Reflector reported the event was the first for the newly constructed outdoor gathering space and featured three Shakespeare plays as part of the festivities.

Dances during the 1920 May Day Fete.

In 1946, the theme of May Day was "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and dances punctuated the acts of the play's presentation. In 1951, the theme was "Una Fiesta Mexicana," and dances were based on aspects of Mexican history.

Program for 1951's "Una Fiesta Mexicana."

Though May Day festivities ended in the 1950s, spring celebrations at Shippensburg have not, though they've taken different forms over the past 60 years.

Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections has plenty of photos and information about historic May Day programs as well as other spring celebrations on campus. To find out more, schedule an appointment at specialcollections@ship.edu.


Sources:
Campus Reflector, April 8, 1936
Class Files, 1933, 1934, 1946, 1951-1954, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
Record Group 30, Box 4, May Day file and May Day fete file, Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.












Friday, April 28, 2017

Extended Library Hours April 30 to May 11

The library's extended hours are in effect now through May 11th.

The library will be open until until 11pm on Friday, 9pm on Saturday, and until 1:00am Sunday through Thursday of Finals week!

Sometimes it's hard to stay inside and focus when it's so nice out (yay for the rain?) but remember the library has quiet study on the upper level and group study areas on the main and lower levels. Study hard! You've Almost Made It!





Thursday, April 27, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 4/27/17: Rail Trail

Throughout this academic year, a lot of construction has happened on the south end of campus. However, in contrast to other recent campus construction, this earth-moving hasn't involved new buildings. Instead, crews are blazing new trails - by extending the Cumberland Valley Rail Trail.


The Cumberland Valley Rail Trail stretches 11 miles from Shippensburg to Newville along a right-of-way previously used by the Cumberland Valley Railroad. It's a multi-use trail open to all ages, and accommodates pedestrians, cyclists, and horses on a route that traverses beautiful rural Cumberland County. Volunteer organization Cumberland Valley Rails-to-Trails has been working for 20 years to establish, maintain and expand the trail, which is free to use.


A CVRR train passes south of Old Main. The steam plant is pictured at left.
On the Shippensburg University campus, recent construction on the trail includes extending the route from Fogelsanger Road to North Earl Street, as well as a new pedestrian bridge stretching over Fogelsanger Road connecting campus to Britton Park. But why has the university gotten involved in this project?
This image from the 1900-1901 CVSNS catalog shows the Cumberland Valley Railroad crossing what is now Prince Street.
When Cumberland Valley State Normal School opened in 1873, Shippensburg was served by three railroads - the Cumberland Valley Railroad, the Western Maryland Railroad, and Philadelphia & Reading Railroad. Chartered in 1837, the Cumberland Valley Railroad ran from Harrisburg to Chambersburg, passing through Shippensburg. Tracks ran adjacent to campus - following the route traced by the new rail trail extension - before continuing south on Earl Street to a station that was located in the area of what is now the Shippensburg Beverage Center.


Western Maryland Railroad and the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad had an agreement to share a station located in the vicinity of the 7-11 on West King Street, as well as tracks. Western Maryland ran south to Chambersburg and Maryland, while P&R traveled north towards Harrisburg.


Passengers wishing to ride CVRR and transfer to another line had to walk several blocks between stations to switch trains. But Shippensburg students riding CVRR at the beginning and end of each term had the benefit of being dropped off on campus because the line ran along the south edge of school property. A stone kiosk stood in front of Old Main near what is now Prince Street to handle students and their baggage.
This kiosk stood on the CVRR at Cumberland Valley State Normal School for use by students at the beginning and end of each term.
Look closely at this image of campus and you'll see the kiosk in front of Old Main, roughly in the middle of the frame.
The special station must have been invaluable to students in an era where cars did not exist and it would have been foolish and expensive to take a horse away from family to keep on campus for months at a time. It was so important to student life that railroad information was featured in the CVSNS catalog from the 1880s until the first decade of the 1900s.


CVSNS Catalog, 1899-1900, page 8.




SU Archives & Special Collections has a variety of photos that show the railroad on campus, including photos in historic catalogs and images on display. To check out those images, make an appointment at specialcollections@ship.edu.


Sources:
Charles Pague, Burkhart Collection, Shippensburg Historical Society, Shippensburg, PA.
Cumberland Valley Rails-to-Trails homepage, http://www.cvrtc.org/index.php (Accessed April 24, 2017).
Cumberland Valley State Normal School Catalog, 1899-1900, 8.
Cumberland Valley State Normal School Catalog, 1900-1901, 25.
Cumberland Valley State Normal School Catalog, 1901-1902, 16.
Cumberland Valley State Normal School Catalog, 1902-1903, 1.
Cumberland Valley State Normal School Catalog, 1903-1904, 1.





Thursday, April 20, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 4/20/17: Herbaria

The warmer weather of spring brings picnics, baseball and frisbee games, and studying with friends outdoors to the Shippensburg campus. In the 1890s, spring also brought much-anticipated adventures in botany for Cumberland Valley State Normal School seniors. 

As a requirement of graduation, students in the elementary course had to take one term of botany under the guidance of Professor Joseph F. Barton. At the end of the class, they had to produce an herbarium of at least 40 species of plants. Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections has six herbaria produced by Dr. Barton's students.

An herbarium by R.H. Cunningham includes an ornate cover lettered in gold ink.

What's an herbarium? In the case of CVSNS, it was a scrapbook of dried plants and specimens, and their descriptions. Descriptions included common and botanical names, and in some cases, where and when the students collected the plants. The projects were small-scale siblings to larger herbaria collected by scientists and large universities.

In this herbarium Dill Stevens, Class of 1899, arrayed Judas Tree specimens in the shape of a cross.

According to the CVSNS catalog, botany students were tasked with learning how to observe plant life in order to make identification on sight. To do this, botany classes took at least one exploratory excursion a week for field work. 

Mary Kerr Hays Main's herbarium includes botanical information about the blood root.

Several of the herbaria in the archives include listings of where the students found the plants. Locations listed include "Old Main Veranda," "C.V.R.R. tracks" or local farm fields identified by farmer. 

Wild carrot specimens included in Fannie Geiger's herbarium include the name of the field where she collected the specimen and the date of the collection.

Other herbaria include general habitat information where plants could be found. Although students were only required to include 40 specimens in their books, the Class of 1897 was reported to include between 60 and 70 in their collections.

Pampas Grass collected by Nellie Geiger specified the plant could be found in lowlands.

Each of the books is tied together with ribbon or cord, and includes dried, pressed specimens mounted on thick pages. The six books in the archives date from 1892 to 1899 and at 120-125 years old, many of them are in great shape, offering a fascinating look at class projects in the 1890s. In 2017, scientists are using historic herbaria to study the history of plants and how ecosystems have evolved or survived over time.

You can see herbaria as well as other scrapbooks from students of the past at Archives & Special Collections. Just make an appointment by emailing specialcollections@ship.edu.

Sources:
Cumberland Valley Normal School Catalog, 1888-1889.
Cumberland Valley Normal School Catalog, 1893-1894, 41.
Normal School Herald, Shippensburg, PA, July 1897, 28-29.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Ship Earth Day Celebration: Thursday April 20, 2017

Shippensburg Campus Earth Day Celebration

Academic Quad, April 20th 11am - 4pm

SEAS will be hosting the Earth Day celebration on Thursday Aptil 20th from 11:00 - 4:00.  Featuring booths and activities by student and local groups and companies:  SEAS, Solarcity, PMI, Counseling Center, Phi Sigma Pi, Beta Beta Beta, GTU, Cycling Club, GESO, Kappa Delta Phi, Spanish Club, Delta Zeta, Equestrian Club, FUSE, Dining Services, Fencing Club, The Slate, Maker Club, Health Sciences Club, and others.

Activities Include:

  • Solar cookout
  • Bike powered milkshakes
  • Games & prizes
  • DIY Recycled crafts
  • Bike repairs
  • Electronics drop off for recycling
  • Plastic bag drop off for recycling
  • Live music
  • And more!
SEAS, Students for Environmental Action and Sustainability, enviro@ship.edu

Shippensburg Campus Earth Day Celebration Thursday April 20th from 11:00-4:00.
Students for Environmental Action and Sustainability (SEAS) will be hosting the Earth Day celebration. Featuring booths and activities by student and local groups and companies.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

National Library Week Wrapup: Why We Love the Library

To celebrate National Library Week, April 9-15, we put a poster board in the Reference area and invited anyone to take a paper heart, write a response to the prompt “Tell Us Why You Love Your Library!” and post it on the display.

We also offered Hershey’s Kisses on April 10 and cookies on April 11. We had a very positive response. Here's a breakout of response themes:

Tell Us Why You Love Your Library
Theme Hearts %
Positive Learning/Study Environment 19 18%
Staff/Librarians/Service 16 16%
Student Workers 13 13%
Learning Center 11 11%
Computers/Scanners/Printing 9 9%
Social Environment 8 8%
Quiet Areas 7 7%
Cookies/Cookies with President 7 7%
Books/Reading 7 7%
Tech Help 3 3%
Starbucks 3 3%

Thursday, April 13, 2017

#TBT in the Archives 4/13/17: CVSNS Historic District

Shippensburg University is fortunate to retain its five original academic buildings, which are still used today by students, administrators and faculty as offices and classrooms and in the case of one building, a residence.

Built between 1873 and 1915, Old Main, Stewart Hall, Horton Hall, Martin House, and Gilbert Hall comprise the Cumberland Valley State Normal School Historic District. The district was officially added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 11, 1985.

Old Main renovations in 1983. The university began work to include the building in the Cumberland Valley State Normal School Historic District during the project.

Finished in 1873, Old Main is the original college building and originally hosted all school facilities until the 1890s. Designed by Samuel Sloan, the Classical Revival building was renovated in 1983-1984. The university nominated Old Main and the other four buildings for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places based on their architectural styles and preservation.

Stewart Hall in the late 1930s.

Stewart Hall, designed by Arthur P. Rosser, was constructed between 1893 and 1895 in the Romanesque Revival style. Originally the school gymnasium, Stewart Hall was later home to the Communications Journalism Department before its current role hosting Theatre Department labs and art studios.

Horton Hall in the 1970s.

Also built in the 1890s, Horton Hall was the second building constructed in the Romanesque Revival style. The building, connected to Old Main by a second-floor bridge, was the CVSNS women's dorm before being converted to offices and the Women's Center.

Martin House in the early 1990s, when it was the home of President Anthony Ceddia.

Martin House was completed in 1908. Designed by Maurice R. Rhoads, the classical-style house is named after its first resident, Principal Samuel Martin and is today the university president's house.

A 1920s postcard showing Gilbert Hall when it was the model school at CVSNS.

Gilbert Hall was the last building to be completed in the historic district. Constructed as the model school in the second decade of the 1900s, it was also designed by Rhoads in the Renaissance Revival style. Today the building is home to classrooms and Multicultural Student Affairs.

The university's application to establish the historic district was signed by the state historic preservation officer on April 19, 1984. This officer, from the Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission, certified the five buildings were important architectural remnants from their period and confirmed the historic district has state significance because of its history as a state normal school. The National Register, a component of the National Park Service, approved the district eight months later.

SU Archives & Special Collections has a copy of the original application to the National Register of Historic Preservation as well as historic photos of these and many other buildings on campus at various times throughout the university's history. To learn more, email specialcollections@ship.edu


Sources:
National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form, Record Group 24, Subgroup 24.8, Box 1, Folder 15. Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.
Photographs: Buildings and Structures on Campus, Record Group 30, Box 1 and Box 1a. Shippensburg University Archives & Special Collections, Shippensburg, PA.